Probiotics for kids? Yes, yes, yes. Children and stomachaches are like peanut butter and jelly, they just go together. But they don’t have to!

Probiotics are beneficial to everyone. 

So, what are they?

They are live microorganisms that can come with some health benefits.

Probiotics are most well-known for promoting a healthy digestive tract as well as a healthy immune system. 

Probiotics are considered “good” bacteria because they keep your gut healthy. You might be thinking, “GROSS, I don’t want bacteria in my tummy, and especially not my kid’s tummy”. But, you actually do. 

Can you take a guess at how much bacteria is in your body right now? Try 100 trillion. I’m not joking! Some studies suggest that each human has around a pound or two of bacteria living in their gut. 

You might as well push for the good bacteria, especially when it can help with gut health.

Why Kids Have Stomach Aches 

According to kidshealth.org, these are the top tummy trouble culprits:

  1. Bacterial infections

If your kiddo has a bacterial infection, they will most likely be prescribed an antibiotic by a doctor. Within a few days, poof, they will be on the up and up (hopefully).  Here’s the thing, antibiotics literally mean “to destroy life”. So you can guess what probiotics means, “life-giving”. 

Antibiotics are great because they kill the bad bacteria making your child sick, but they also kill the good bacteria. That’s why your doctor might recommend that your child eat yogurt or take a probiotic when and after they take antibiotics.

Over time, the more antibiotics you take, the more good bacteria will be killed off, so it needs to be replaced. 

Taking a probiotic helps repopulate the good bacteria that can help fight future infections. 

2. Viruses

Antibiotics don’t help against viruses, but do you know what does? Probiotics :). When a virus gets in your intestinal tract, good bacteria surround and neutralize the virus. Good bacteria form a barrier along your intestinal lining which prevents the virus from passing through the lining and into the bloodstream. To sum it up, taking a probiotic/prebiotic daily helps build up your immune system so that you have some internal protection fighting off outside viruses. 

3. Constipation: Probably the most common reason for tummy aches. 

If you are a first-time parent, you might have been surprised to find out that it’s common for babies to deal with constipation. Red face, lots of grunts, and then you open the diaper to find…nada. But mamas and papas, let’s be honest, we all deal with some constipation every now and then. Maybe it’s from certain meds, your diet, or most commonly dehydration. The right bacteria in your gut helps produce enzymes to digest food, it also helps break down your stool. Probiotics help you get it done!

4. Irritation and Inflammation

When we have an infection or an illness our immune system responds with inflammation. A recent study by the Arthritis Foundation found that Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium can help the body with certain ailments. 

Why Are Probiotics and Prebiotics Important For Kids (and everyone else)?

Our gut health is affected by our environment, experiences, diet, and medications. You can help your kiddos out by making sure they get a healthy diet every day but if we are being honest with ourselves, that doesn’t always happen. 

Same with medications. As we mentioned above, antibiotics are amazing for killing infections. They are also amazing for killing the good guys (aka good bacterias) too. 

Probiotics and prebiotics are bodyguards and you are Whitney Houston (if you know, you know ;)). They are on guard 24/7 to help protect you. And in the end, you might just fall in love with them.

When Being Regular is Cool

The gut is widely called the second brain. This underrated and oftentimes forgotten organ system not only affects digestion, but it is also linked to mood, health, and even the way you think. 

Have you ever felt butterflies when you’ve been nervous? Or maybe you had a tough decision to make and you just “went with your gut”. These are real things.

John Hopkins Medicine published a great article going into detail on, “The Brain-Gut Connection”. Long story short, the gut might not be capable of thought but it can communicate to the top brain and largely impact mood changes. 

I don’t know about you but I would like to take care of both of my brains. If I can have my own internal bodyguards keeping me safe, I will take it.

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